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20130122
20130122
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
seeing the debt ceiling -- using the debt ceiling for leverage is a mistake. i'll finish with this, because we were at the ways and means committee and i gave the opening statement, and one of the witnesses are talked about gramm-rudman. it was attached to a debt ceiling bill. i was among the democrats who voted for it, but it passed -- it was deemed passed in the house. and the debt ceiling bill was used by senators as a vehicle, not as a threat. and not for leverage but as a vehicle to attach deficit reduction. so the use of the debt ceiling for the purpose that is ascribed to this one does not have a history that supports its use for this purpose. and so to the extent that you have the ability to look at this issue, i would urge that this is not only a dangerous precedent but a very likely problem for the economy when we need to emphasize economic growth and jobs. so i say that in a somewhat sober way because of what happened before. thank you. >> thank you very much. i'd like to welcome mr. brady, former chairman of the house administration committee, who's joining us today and
it so i really think that we should not be using the debt ceiling for leverage. i think it's bad for the economy. >> you have said that in terms of finding ways to raise revenue, the president's proposed limit on tax deductions is the most likely path. can you walk me through how you see this thing happening? >> well, there have to be more revenues. we have to as the president said yesterday have a balanced package in deficit reduction. and i think looking at the deductions will be one route doing that. we have to be careful. i have made that clear. but we're going to have to look at that. as one of the techniques to raise revenues it has to be balanced. we need to look at cuts in programs, discretionary programs have already been cut. we need to be careful. we need to remember what's at stake in those programs. we need revenues as well as program cuts. >> obviously, we have a lot of investors, people who watch the markets, watching us right now. this idea of repealing carried interest tax breaks, are you in favor of that and do you think that idea would make its way through the
world in which we no longer have a debt ceiling. in addition to basically saying we don't have enough sort of leverage on this to fight on it, they have also set the precedent of you know what we can do, make the debt ceiling disappear, and then nobody has to vote on raising it. i think they should do that for a little bit longer. like forever. >> it is smoke and mirrors. i really don't think the world republican necessarily applies to many of the members in the house republican caucus. unfortunately, we have to leave it there. thank you, my friend, for your time, and infinite wisdom. it is always great to see you. coming up after the break, the decades after the struggle for equal rights began, there are still a handful of states that continue to deny basic health services to women. one of them is mississippi where a pitched battle threat toenz deny the estate's women their constitutional right to reproductive choice. we will speak with planned patient hooth cecil richards next on "now." at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do ba
place. do the debt ceiling, the next one so at oe point we have got to use leverage we have to bring this spending down and to actually make the president do what he said in the speech. lou: perhaps ag agree vat, you have the leverage in point of fact to pressure the senate to move towards a budget. you have the -- >> no -- lou: do you still have the leverage to say no? >> there's not a bigger windmill we're jousting at. i cashed out everything other than my house in the i wy of assets to run for congress. i made sacrifices in income to become a judge when we needed one in tyler, texas, and now i'm told that we are going to give the pour to the senate -- lou: who is telling you that? >> to determine whether or not house members get paid. lou: congressman, who is telling you that? who is telling you that? >> our leadership has said, and there was people in the conference that want to do that. they said, hey, pass a law that says we don't get paid if everybody in the house and senate doesn't pass a budget. i'm going you're going to give the mill naivers club down in the senate the auth
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)